A Beginner's Guide to Launching a Career in Web Development

Web Development Expert

Sunday, February 4th, 2024

Being able to build a website from scratch is an invaluable skill in today’s technology-driven job market. You could, for instance, create the next big thing and make millions off advertising revenue.

You’ll find this guide to be incredibly in-depth if you’re learning web development or thinking of becoming one.

Not only will it explain how to become a web developer, but it’ll also show you the way to become a successful, well-paid one. The first thing you’ll need to do is decide whether or not web development is right for you.

If it sounds interesting, continue reading on—this guide will teach you everything you need to know before enrolling in any course for becoming a web developer.

If it does sound like your cup of tea, then you should continue reading to find essential information on how to become a web developer.

Don't Lack a
Real-World Project Experience!

Become a web developer, and you can build landing pages, eCommerce stores—even entire websites from scratch.


When do you want to start?

Web Development Course Overview

To get started as a web developer, it’s crucial to learn the theoretical basics of web developments—that way you’ll have an idea of what makes websites tick.

Introduction to Web Development and Who They're

Web development is like building and decorating a house on the internet. The people who do this are called web developers. Imagine the internet as a big neighborhood, and each website is like a house with its own unique style and features.

Web developers are the architects and builders of these digital houses. They use special languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create the structure, design, and interactivity of a website. HTML is like the foundation, CSS is like the paint and decorations, and JavaScript adds the cool gadgets and features.

Just like real houses, websites need maintenance and updates. Web developers make sure everything runs smoothly and looks good. They work with different tools and technologies to bring websites to life.

So, when you visit a website, know that web developers are the creative minds behind it, making the internet a vibrant and functional place for everyone.

History of Web Development

Think about the internet like a big story that started a long time ago. 

In the beginning, websites were like simple pages with text and pictures. They couldn’t do much. Then, around 1995, something called JavaScript came along. It made websites more interesting by adding movement and letting people interact with them.

As time went on, the internet got even better. Websites started using videos and music, and you could do things like shop online and connect with friends. In the early 2000s, making websites became easier with systems like WordPress.

Nowadays, the internet is like a huge and always-changing place. 

Websites can adjust to different screen sizes, and there are really cool applications that use a lot of data. The internet keeps getting better, giving us more ways to be creative and try new things.

Web Development vs. Web Programming

Also, in the world of technology, many companies and individuals are confused about the difference between web development and web programming.

While they are closely related fields, there are distinct differences between the two. 

Understanding these differences is crucial for choosing the right career path and excelling in the web development domain.

Web Development: A Wider World

Web development encompasses the entire process of creating a website or web application, from conceptualization and planning to design, implementation, and maintenance. It involves a range of skills and expertise, including:

Front-end development: Focusing on the user-facing aspects of a website, such as the visual design, layout, and user interface (UI) elements. Front-end developers primarily use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create interactive and engaging web pages.

Some of the key components of front-end web development include:

  • HTML (HyperText Markup Language): HTML is the fundamental building block of web pages. It defines the structure and content of a web page using a markup language.
  • CSS (Cascading Style Sheets): CSS is used to style the appearance of HTML elements. It controls the layout, colors, fonts, and other visual aspects of a web page.
  • JavaScript: JavaScript is a scripting language that adds interactivity to web pages. It can be used to create animations, handle user input, and make web pages more dynamic.

Back-end development: Dealing with the server-side logic and data management of a website or web application. Back-end developers utilize programming languages like Python, Java, or PHP to create the underlying infrastructure that powers a website’s functionality.

  • Storing and retrieving data: Back-end developers use databases to store data such as user information, product information, and order details.
  • Processing requests: Back-end developers write code to handle user requests, such as when a user submits a form or logs in to their account.
  • Communicating with other systems: Back-end developers may need to integrate their website with other systems, such as payment gateways or email servers.

Full-stack development: Combining both front-end and back-end skills, it allows developers to handle the entire web development process, from the user interface to the server-side logic.

Web Programming: The Core Coding Aspect
Web programming, on the other hand, is a more specific subset of web development, primarily focused on the coding and implementation of web applications. It involves writing code to create the functionality and logic that drive a website or web application.

Web programmers: Primarily use programming languages like Python, Java, JavaScript, and PHP to develop the server-side logic, application programming interfaces (APIs), and databases that power web applications. They may also work on front-end development tasks, but their primary focus lies on the coding aspect.

Web Development vs. Web Programming: The Key Distinction
The key distinction between web development and web programming lies in their scope and breadth. Web development encompasses the entire process of creating and maintaining a website, while web programming focuses specifically on the coding and implementation aspects.

Web development encompasses the entire process of creating and maintaining a website, while web programming focuses specifically on the coding and implementation aspects.

Choosing Your Path: Web Developer vs. Web Programmer

The choice between pursuing a career in web development or web programming depends on your interests and skillset.

  • If you enjoy the creative and design aspects of websites, a career in front-end development might be a good fit.
  • If you have a strong aptitude for problem-solving and enjoy working with logic and algorithms, back-end development could be a suitable path.
  • If you’re passionate about coding and want to build the entire web development stack, full-stack development offers a comprehensive and rewarding career option.
  • And if you’re drawn to the intricacies of programming languages and want to focus on the coding aspect, web programming could be your ideal choice.

And, remember: the demand for skilled web developers and programmers is high, so there are many opportunities in these fields.

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment for web developers is projected to grow 16% to 30% between 2022 and 2032—much faster than average for all occupations.

With the ever-evolving nature of web technologies, continuous learning and upskilling are essential for success in either field.

What Types of Web Development Exist?

Web development is a broad field, and it’s important for both professionals and amateurs alike to understand its different types. While the right one for you depends on your needs and interests,.

There are three main types of web development:

  • Front-end web development is responsible for the look and feel of a website. Front-end developers use HTML, CSS, and JavaScript to create the user interface (UI) of a website. The UI is what users see and interact with, so it is important for front-end developers to be able to create UIs that are both visually appealing and easy to use.
  • Back-end web development is responsible for the server-side logic of a website. Back-end developers use programming languages like Java, Python, and PHP to create the server-side applications that power websites. Server-side applications are responsible for tasks such as storing data, processing requests, and communicating with other systems.
  • Full-stack web development is a combination of front-end and back-end web development. Full-stack developers are able to create both the UI and the server-side logic of a website. This makes them very versatile developers who are in high demand.

Along with the three main types of web development—front-end, back-end, and full-stack—a variety of specializations exist, such as:

 

  • Mobile web development, which is responsible for creating websites that are optimized for mobile devices.
  • E-commerce web development, which is responsible for creating websites that can be used to sell products or services online.
  • Web security development, which is responsible for protecting websites from security threats.

The Main Stages of Web Development

Web development typically follows the same main stages, though they may vary slightly depending on your source:

Information Gathering: This stage involves understanding the client’s requirements, defining the website’s purpose, and identifying the target audience.

Planning and Strategy: In this phase, a project schedule is created and a rough plan is developed. It also includes wireframing, which outlines the basic structure and layout of the website.

Design: The design stage focuses on creating the look and feel of the website, including graphical design and user experience considerations.

Content Writing and Assembly: This stage involves creating and organizing the content that will be featured on the website.

Coding/Development: The actual coding and development of the website take place in this phase, including front-end and back-end development.

Testing: The website is thoroughly tested to ensure that it functions properly and is free of any bugs or issues.

Review and Launch: Before the website is launched, it undergoes a final review to ensure that it meets all the requirements and is ready for deployment.

Maintenance: Once the website is live, it requires ongoing maintenance to ensure that it remains up-to-date and continues to function properly.

Course Structure

As you can see from the above, there are a lot of interesting things to know about web development. 

To ensure success with your own site while learning, be sure to take advantage of any structured coursework available in web development classes.

Duration and Format

A web development course is usually available in either of two formats:

  • Institutional Program
  • Online Course

Institutional Program

An institutional program is one that is offered by a traditional educational institution. You will need to enroll in this type of course and attend classes in person with other students at the same time.

Here is a general overview of the duration and format of the institutional program:

  • Duration: Varies depending on the degree program and institution.
  • Format: On-campus or blended learning.

Online Course

Online courses are the perfect way for people who need to balance their studies with a busy schedule—such as working professionals—to learn what they want, when they want.

There are many different types of online courses available, but all have the same goal: to teach you how to create a website.

Here is an overview of the duration and format of the online course:

  • Duration: It generally takes 2–3 months (but varies based on platform).
  • Format: Online

Prerequisites

To become a pro web developer, you’ll need to learn—and master—a variety of skills and technologies.

But the good news is that you don’t need to know everything from the start. The best way to learn web development is by starting with the basics and building on them as you go along.

Here are some of the basic prerequisites:

  1. HTML (HyperText Markup Language): HTML is the foundation of all web pages. It is used to define the structure and content of a web page.
  2. CSS (Cascading Style Sheets): CSS is used to style web pages. It controls the layout, colors, and fonts of a web page.
  3. JavaScript: JavaScript is a programming language that can be used to add interactivity to web pages. It can be used to create animations, forms, and other dynamic content.
  4. Git: Git is a version control system that allows you to track changes to your code and collaborate with others.
  5. Basic understanding of computer science concepts: This includes concepts such as algorithms, data structures, and object-oriented programming.
  6. Problem-solving skills: Web development often involves solving problems and coming up with creative solutions.
  7. Attention to detail: Web developers need to be able to pay attention to detail and catch errors in their code.
  8. Strong communication skills: Web developers need to be able to communicate effectively with clients, designers, and other developers.

Course Modules and Topics Covered

Before you can start learning how to become a web developer, it’s also important that you have a basic understanding of the course modules and topics covered.

  • HTML Lists, HTML Boilerplate
  • HTML Image Elements
  • HTML Links and Anchor Tags
  • HTML Tables
  • HTML Forms
  • HTML Tables for Layout
  • Inline CSS, Internal CSS
  • External CSS, CSS Selectors
  • How to Debug CSS Code
  • The Box Model of a Website
  • Styling CSS Display Property
  • CSS Static and Relative Positioning
  • Installing Bootstrap
  • Web Design 101-Wire Framing
  • Bootstrap Navigation Bar

Hands-on Projects and Assignments

If you complete one of the above courses, your knowledge and understanding about how websites work will deepen, and hands-on projects will allow you to practice what you have learned.

Here are some interesting, challenging web development projects you can work on:

Build a personal portfolio website: This is a great way to showcase your skills and experience to potential employers. You can use this website to highlight your best work, list your accomplishments, and provide contact information.

Create a blog or online magazine: If you’re passionate about a particular topic, you can create a blog or online magazine to share your knowledge with others. This is a great way to build an audience and establish yourself as an expert in your field.

Develop a web application: There are endless possibilities when it comes to developing web applications. You could create a productivity app, a social media app, or a game. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination.

Design and implement a REST API: REST APIs are a popular way to create web services that can be consumed by other applications. If you’re interested in back-end development, this is a great project to learn about REST APIs.

Through this course, you will receive guidance and feedback from experienced instructors.

Don't Lack a
Real-World Project Experience!

Become a web developer, and you can build landing pages, eCommerce stores—even entire websites from scratch.


When do you want to start?

Assessments and Exams

Many institutions that offer certificate programs in web development require students to take assessment exams. However, many don’t.

If you’re looking for a certificate program that requires assessment exams, it’s important to ensure that the course is accredited by an industry-recognized organization.

And, if you’re in search of exams to measure your skills, you can find a variety of free and paid practice tests online.

Here are some free practice tests or exams online for web developers to test their skills:

TestDome: TestDome offers a variety of free practice tests for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and more.

Codility: Codility offers a free practice test for web developers that covers a variety of programming concepts, including algorithms, data structures, and object-oriented programming.

HackerRank: HackerRank offers a free practice test for web developers that covers a variety of programming languages and frameworks, including JavaScript, React, and Node.js.

LeetCode: LeetCode offers a free practice test for web developers that covers a variety of algorithms and data structures.

W3Schools: W3Schools offers a variety of free practice tests for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SQL, and more.

Pluralsight: Pluralsight offers a variety of paid practice tests and exams for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and more.

Udemy: Udemy offers a variety of paid practice tests and exams for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and more.

Coursera: Coursera offers a variety of paid practice tests and exams for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and more.

edX: edX offers a variety of paid practice tests and exams for web developers, covering a wide range of skills and technologies. You can take practice tests for HTML, CSS, JavaScript, jQuery, PHP, and more.

Course Content

Some courses focus on teaching you the theory behind web development, while others focus more on practical applications.

Here are the contents of courses that will help you study clearly and easily if you’ll be learning web development:

Introduction to Web Development
Fundamental overview of web development principles and their role in the digital landscape.

Designing
The basics of web design cover principles such as layout, color theory, and user experience (UX).

HTML (Hypertext Markup Language)
The foundational language for creating the structure and content of web pages.

CSS (Cascading Style Sheets)
Styling techniques to enhance the visual appearance of HTML elements.

JQuery
A JavaScript library that simplifies interaction with HTML documents, enabling dynamic content and animations.

Slicing
The process of converting a design mockup into functional HTML and CSS code.

PHP (Hypertext Preprocessor)
Server-side scripting language for creating dynamic web pages and interacting with databases.

MySQL
A relational database management system is used in conjunction with PHP to store and retrieve data.

JavaScript
Scripting language for enhancing interactivity and adding dynamic features to web pages.

CMS (Content Management System)
Understanding and potentially working with systems that facilitate the creation and management of digital content.

SEO (search engine optimization)
Techniques to optimize websites for better visibility and ranking on search engines.

Web Hosting
Concepts related to hosting websites include domain registration, server setup, and deployment.

Through a combination of lectures, labs, and hands-on exercises in this course’s structure, students will develop both frontend and backend skills needed to build dynamic web applications.

Tools and Software

Students who enroll to study web development will gain the practical skills, knowledge, and experience necessary to build and maintain web applications, as well as the tools and software that can be used to do so.

A few of the names of tools and software that students will learn in this course include:

Sublime Text
Sublime Text is a versatile and lightweight text editor. It provides a user-friendly interface with powerful features, making it a popular choice among developers for coding and text editing.

Atom
Atom is an open-source text editor developed by GitHub. It is known for its flexibility and extensibility through packages, allowing developers to customize their coding environment according to their preferences.

Chrome Developer Tools
Chrome Developer Tools is a set of web authoring and debugging tools built into the Google Chrome browser. It enables developers to inspect and manipulate the structure of web pages, debug JavaScript, and optimize website performance.

GitHub
GitHub is a web-based platform for version control using Git. It facilitates collaboration among developers, allowing them to manage and track changes in their code, work on projects simultaneously, and contribute to open-source projects.

CodePen
CodePen is an online development environment for front-end developers. It allows users to create and share HTML, CSS, and JavaScript code snippets. It’s particularly useful for experimenting with code and showcasing small projects.

Bootstrap
Bootstrap is a popular open-source front-end framework that simplifies the process of designing responsive and visually appealing websites. It includes pre-designed components and a grid system, making it easier for developers to create consistent and mobile-friendly layouts.

Sass
Sass (Syntactically Awesome Stylesheets) is a preprocessor scripting language that is interpreted or compiled into CSS. It adds functionality to CSS, such as variables, nested rules, and mixins, making stylesheets more maintainable and scalable.

Grunt
Grunt is a JavaScript task runner that automates repetitive tasks in the development process. It is particularly useful for tasks such as minification, compilation, unit testing, and more. Grunt helps streamline the workflow and improve overall project efficiency.

Practical Skills in Data Science

In order to become a web developer, you need two types of important skills: technical and non-technical.

Technical Skills

Coding: Proficiency in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript for front-end development, and PHP or Node.js for back-end development

Version Control: Knowledge of Git for managing code and collaborating with other developers

Libraries and Frameworks: Familiarity with popular libraries and frameworks, such as Bootstrap and jQuery

Testing and Debugging: Ability to test and debug code for functionality, usability, and performance

Responsive Design: Understanding responsive design principles to create websites that adapt to different devices and screen sizes

Non-Technical Skills

User Experience: Knowledge of user experience (UX) principles to create websites that are easy to use and visually appealing

Teamwork: Ability to work effectively with other developers and stakeholders in a team environment

Time Management: Capability to manage time and prioritize tasks to complete projects within deadlines

Analytical Skills: Ability to analyze problems and find solutions to improve website performance and user experience

Continuous Learning: Willingness to stay updated with the latest web development trends and technologies



Resources and Support

To stay updated with the latest web development trends and technologies, you need to stay connected with your peers. 

This means reading blogs and forums, attending training sessions or conferences, as well as reading books, which can help developers learn new things throughout their lives as programmers.

You will also need access to resources and support systems, such as:

Web Development Books

Books serve as valuable resources for in-depth learning and understanding of web development concepts. They provide comprehensive coverage of topics, from beginner to advanced levels, offering insights and practical knowledge.

Here’s a list of highly recommended web development books for beginners:

  1. HTML and CSS: Design and Build Websites by Jon Duckett: This comprehensive guide to HTML and CSS provides a thorough introduction to the fundamentals of web design and development. It covers everything from creating basic HTML pages to styling them with CSS, making it an excellent choice for beginners.
  2. JavaScript and JQuery: Interactive Front-End Web Development by Jon Duckett: This book delves into the world of JavaScript and jQuery, the essential tools for creating interactive web pages. It covers essential concepts like event handling, DOM manipulation, and AJAX, equipping beginners with the skills to build dynamic web applications.
  3. Eloquent JavaScript, 3rd Edition: A Modern Introduction to Programming by Marijn Haverbeke: This book takes a unique approach to teaching JavaScript, focusing on programming concepts and problem-solving skills. It’s an excellent choice for beginners who want to understand the fundamentals of JavaScript and programming in general.
  4. JavaScript: The Definitive Guide: Master the World’s Most-Used Programming Language, 7th Edition by David Flanagan: This comprehensive guide to JavaScript covers everything from basic syntax to advanced concepts like object-oriented programming and asynchronous programming. It’s a valuable resource for beginners who want to master JavaScript and become proficient web developers.
  5. Learning Web Design: A Beginner’s Guide to HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and Web Graphics by Jennifer Niederst Robbins: This book provides a comprehensive introduction to web design and development, covering HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and web graphics. It’s an excellent choice for beginners who want to learn the fundamentals of web design and development from scratch.

Online Communities

Engaging with online communities allows web developers to connect with peers, seek advice, and stay updated on industry trends. Specialized forums provide spaces for discussions and help you keep track of what’s trending in your field.

Here are some of the most popular and highly regarded online communities for web developers:

  1. Stack Overflow: Stack Overflow is a question-and-answer website for professional and enthusiast programmers. It’s a great place to ask and answer questions about web development, get feedback on your code, and learn from other developers.
  2. Dev.to: Dev.to is a community-driven platform for developers to share knowledge, ask questions, and discuss all things tech. It’s a great place to stay up-to-date with the latest trends in web development and connect with other developers.
  3. Hashnode: Hashnode is a blogging platform for developers to share their thoughts, tutorials, and experiences. It’s a great place to learn from other developers and discover new tools and techniques.
  4. Code Newbie: Code Newbie is a community for new developers to ask questions, find resources, and connect with other beginners. It’s a supportive and welcoming environment for those just starting their web development journey.
  5. FreeCodeCamp: FreeCodeCamp is a non-profit organization that provides free online courses and programming tutorials. It’s a great way to learn the basics of web development and build your skills at your own pace.
  6. Mozilla Developer Network (MDN): MDN is a comprehensive web development resource from Mozilla, the makers of the Firefox browser. It provides documentation, tutorials, and reference materials for a wide range of web development topics.

Code Review Platforms

Code review platforms enable developers to receive constructive feedback on their code from peers or experienced professionals. This iterative process helps improve code quality, discover best practices, and learn from others.

Here’s a list of popular code review platforms that help developers ensure the quality and consistency of their code:

  1. GitHub: GitHub is a widely used version control platform that also offers integrated code review capabilities. It allows developers to review code changes, provide feedback, and track the status of code reviews.
  2. GitLab: GitLab is another popular version control platform with integrated code review features. It provides a user-friendly interface for reviewing code, including inline comments, diffs, and threaded discussions.
  3. Review Board: Review Board is a standalone code review platform that can be integrated with various version control systems, including Git, SVN, and Mercurial. It provides a flexible and customizable code review workflow.
  4. Gerrit: Gerrit is a code review tool primarily used for large-scale projects, particularly in the open-source community. It offers advanced features for managing code reviews and maintaining code quality.
  5. Crucible: Crucible is a code review platform from Atlassian, the company behind popular tools like Jira and Confluence. It integrates well with other Atlassian products and provides a streamlined code review process.

Coding Bootcamps

Coding bootcamps offer intensive, immersive programs designed to accelerate the learning process for aspiring developers. These programs often provide hands-on projects, mentorship, and a supportive environment for rapid skill development.

Here are some of the top-rated coding bootcamps in the world:

  1. Bloom Institute of Technology: Bloom Institute of Technology is a coding bootcamp that offers full-stack web development courses. They have a strong track record of providing high-quality education and placing graduates in jobs with top companies.
  2. Altcademy: Altcademy is an online coding bootcamp that offers courses in web development, data science, and machine learning. They have a strong track record of providing high-quality education and placing graduates in jobs with top companies.
  3. Flatiron School: Flatiron School offers full-time and part-time coding bootcamps in web development and software engineering. They are known for their rigorous curriculum and focus on job placement.
  4. Fullstack Academy: Fullstack Academy is an online coding bootcamp that offers full-stack web development courses. They have a strong track record of providing high-quality education and placing graduates in jobs with top companies.
  5. Coding Dojo: Coding Dojo offers full-time and part-time coding bootcamps in web development, data science, and mobile development. They are known for their hands-on curriculum and focus on real-world projects.
  6. Simplilearn: Simplilearn is another leading online education platform in India that offers a variety of coding bootcamps, including full-stack web development, data science, and cyber security. They have a strong track record of providing industry-relevant education and placing graduates in jobs with top companies.

Bootcamp

Location

Type of Program

Length

General Assembly

Various

Full-time, part-time

12-16 weeks

Thinkful

Online

Full-time, part-time

12-24 weeks

Flatiron School

New York, NY

Full-time, part-time

12-15 weeks

App Academy

San Francisco, CA

Full-time

12 weeks

Coding Dojo

Various

Full-time, part-time

12-14 weeks

Blogs to Learn Web Development

Web development blogs serve as valuable resources for staying informed about the latest trends, technologies, and best practices. These blogs often feature tutorials, case studies, and insights from experienced developers.

Some popular web development blogs include:

  • Smashing Magazine: Offers articles on various web development topics, including front-end and back-end technologies, design principles, and coding techniques.
  • CSS-Tricks: Focuses on CSS and front-end development, providing tips, tricks, and tutorials for creating visually appealing and responsive web interfaces.
  • Mozilla Developer Network (MDN): The official resource for web developers by Mozilla, MDN provides comprehensive documentation, guides, and tutorials on web technologies, including HTML, CSS, and JavaScript.
  • A List Apart: Covers a wide range of topics related to web design and development, with a focus on best practices, user experience, and responsive design.
  • SitePoint: Offers tutorials, articles, and ebooks covering various aspects of web development, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, and popular frameworks.
  • freeCodeCamp Blog: The blog of the freeCodeCamp platform provides articles and tutorials on coding, web development projects, and interviews with industry professionals.
  • CSS Tricks: Not only a valuable resource for CSS-related content but also covers broader web development topics, offering insights and solutions to common challenges.
  • Medium Web Development: Medium hosts a community of writers covering a wide range of web development topics. Following relevant publications or individual writers can provide diverse perspectives and insights.

Instructor and Influencer

If you’re engaging yourself in a learning process, it’s important to have an instructor or influencer. Someone who will guide you through the journey of becoming an expert in your web development field.

Some of the best people to follow for web development are:

Addy Osmani: Author of JavaScript Design Patterns, shares tips about web development, JavaScript, and web performance.

Kent C. Dodds: Educator specializing in front-end development, offers blog posts, workshops, and courses.

Gergely Orosz: Author of the Pragmatic Engineer newsletter and blog, provides insights on current events in the development world.

Brad Frost: Mobile web strategist and front-end designer, known for his work on the Entertainment Weekly mobile site and book “Atomic Design.”

Ronald Bien: CEO and founder of Naldz Graphics, offers web design advice and tutorials focused on WordPress themes.

Dan Abramov: Core developer of React and author of books like “The Tao of React,” known for his consistent content and focus on workflow improvement.

Ahmad Shadeed: Laravel developer and author of “Mastering Laravel,” offers in-depth tutorials and guides on Laravel framework development.

Top Websites to Learn Web Development

Every beginning web developer has to start somewhere, and there are many great sites that can help you get started with your coding journey.

Here are some of the best websites to learn web development that are available today.

YHills
YHills is an online education platform that offers a variety of courses on web development, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, React, Node.js, and more. Their courses are well-structured and easy to follow, and they include a variety of coding exercises and challenges to help you learn the material. YHills also offers live online classes and bootcamps, which can be a great way to learn from experienced instructors and get hands-on experience with web development projects.

Coursera
Coursera is an online learning platform that offers courses from top universities and organizations around the world. You can find web development courses from institutions like Stanford University, Google, and IBM. Coursera’s courses are typically more rigorous and in-depth than those offered by other online learning platforms, and they often include assignments and projects that require you to apply what you’ve learned.

edX
edX is an online learning platform that offers courses from top universities and organizations around the world. You can find web development courses from institutions like MIT, Harvard University, and Microsoft. edX’s courses are typically less expensive than those offered by Coursera, and they are often self-paced, so you can learn at your own speed.

W3Schools
W3Schools is a popular online tutorial website that offers beginner-friendly tutorials on web development languages and frameworks. It’s a great place to learn the basics of HTML, CSS, JavaScript, SQL, and more. W3Schools is a well-organized and easy-to-navigate website, and it offers a variety of learning resources, including interactive tutorials, quizzes, and coding exercises.

Career Opportunities

As a student interested in a career in web development, you may be wondering what kinds of careers are available to you or how you can gain experience in this field.

Well, there are many career opportunities and tips to help you find your first job. Let’s discuss each:

Job Roles in Web Development

  1. Web development encompasses a wide range of job roles, each with its own set of responsibilities and required skills.

    Here’s a breakdown of some of the most common job roles in web development:

    Front-End Developer

    Front-end developers are responsible for the user-facing aspects of a website or application. They focus on creating visually appealing and interactive interfaces that ensure a seamless user experience. Their tasks include:

    • Writing and structuring HTML code to create the basic framework of a website
    • Styling the website using CSS to enhance its visual appearance and layout
    • Implementing JavaScript to add interactivity and dynamic elements to the website
    • Ensuring the website is responsive and adapts to different devices and screen sizes
    • Collaborating with designers to translate design concepts into functional code

    Back-End Developer:

    Back-end developers focus on the server-side logic and data management of a website or application. They handle the behind-the-scenes operations that ensure the website functions correctly and interacts with databases and other backend services. Their responsibilities include:

    • Developing and maintaining server-side code using programming languages like Python, Java, or PHP
    • Designing and implementing database structures to store and manage website data
    • Building APIs (application programming interfaces) to connect the website with external services and applications
    • Ensuring the website is secure and protected from potential vulnerabilities
    • Optimizing the website’s performance and scalability to handle increasing user traffic

    Full-Stack Developer

    Full-stack developers possess a comprehensive understanding of both front-end and back-end development. They can handle the entire development process, from creating the user interface to managing the server-side logic and data interactions. Their skills include:

    • Proficient in both front-end technologies like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript
    • Expertise in back-end development using languages like Python, Java, or PHP
    • Understanding of database design and data management principles
    • Ability to build and maintain APIs for data exchange and integration
    • Strong problem-solving and analytical skills are needed to handle complex development challenges.

    DevOps Engineer

    DevOps engineers bridge the gap between development and operations teams, ensuring seamless collaboration and efficient delivery of software updates. They focus on automating and optimizing the software development lifecycle, which includes:

    • Automating testing and deployment processes to streamline software releases
    • Implementing continuous integration and continuous delivery (CI/CD) pipelines to accelerate development and delivery
    • Managing infrastructure and cloud resources to support the deployment and scaling of applications
    • Monitoring and troubleshooting system performance to identify and resolve issues promptly
    • Collaborating with developers and operations teams to promote collaboration and break down silos

    Web Designer

    Web designers create the visual elements and user interface (UI) of a website or application. They focus on the aesthetics, usability, and accessibility of the website, ensuring a positive user experience. Their tasks include:

    • Creating wireframes and prototypes to visualize the layout and structure of the website
    • Developing visual elements such as icons, typography, and color palettes
    • Ensuring the website adheres to design principles for usability and accessibility
    • Collaborating with front-end developers to translate design concepts into functional code
    • Staying up-to-date with design trends and best practices

    These are just a few of the many job roles in web development. The specific skills and responsibilities required for each role may vary depending on the company, project scope, and technology stack used.

    Web Developer Resume Tips

    It’s important to tailor your resume to each position you apply for. If you’re applying for a web developer position, make sure to highlight any related skills in your resume.

    To craft a compelling web developer resume, consider these tips:

    1. Clear and Concise Contact Information:

    Ensure your name, phone number, email address, and LinkedIn profile (if applicable) are easily visible at the top of the resume.

    2. Professional Summary:

    Write a concise professional summary that highlights your key skills, experience, and what makes you a unique candidate. Tailor this to the specific job you’re applying for.

    3. Skills Section:

    List your technical skills prominently. Include both hard skills (programming languages, frameworks, and tools) and soft skills (communication and problem-solving).

    4. Work Experience:

    • Relevant Experience: Focus on relevant work experience. Highlight projects that demonstrate your skills and achievements.
    • Quantify Achievements: Use metrics to quantify your impact (e.g., “Increased website speed by 30%”).
    • Action Verbs: Begin bullet points with strong action verbs to describe your responsibilities and accomplishments.

    5. Projects:

    Include a section for personal or side projects. This is a great way to showcase your practical skills and passion for web development.

    6. Education:

    Mention your educational background, including degrees, institutions, and graduation dates. If you’re an experienced developer, this section can be concise.

    7. Certifications:

    If you have relevant certifications (e.g., AWS Certified Developer, Google Certified Professional), include them to validate your expertise.

    8. GitHub or Portfolio Link:

    If applicable, include a link to your GitHub profile or an online portfolio. This provides employers with tangible examples of your work.

    9. Keywords:

    Use industry-relevant keywords from the job description. Many companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to scan resumes for specific keywords.

    10. Tailor for Each Application:

    Customize your resume for each job application. Highlight the skills and experiences that are most relevant to the specific position.

    11. Formatting:

    • Keep the design clean and professional.
    • Use a readable font and consistent formatting.
    • Consider using bullet points for easy readability.

    12. Update Regularly:

    Keep your resume updated with your latest skills and experiences. This makes it easier to apply for new opportunities quickly.

    13. Proofread:

    Eliminate typos and grammatical errors. A well-proofread resume reflects attention to detail.

    14. References:

    It’s usually not necessary to include references on the resume. Simply state that references are available upon request.

     

Industry Trends and Future Prospects

Computer science and engineering is a growing field, and it is expected to continue expanding in the coming years. There will be ample job opportunities—even if they aren’t as plentiful as they are now—for people with training in this area.

The web development industry is also constantly evolving, driven by advancements in technology and changing user expectations.

Here are some of the key trends and future prospects shaping the landscape:

1. Responsive Design is the norm
More than 92.3% of internet users access websites on mobile devices, according to research. This trend emphasizes the importance of responsive design, ensuring websites look great and function smoothly on various screen sizes.

2. Rise of Progressive Web Apps (PWAs)
PWAs are gaining popularity, with a growth rate of over 30% annually. These apps provide a seamless user experience by combining the best of web and mobile applications, offering offline functionality and faster load times.

3. Increased Adoption of Single Page Applications (SPAs)
SPAs, like React and Vue.js, have seen a surge in adoption, constituting about 40% of web development projects. They provide a smoother user experience by loading only the necessary content, reducing page reloads.

4. Emphasis on Cybersecurity
With cyber threats on the rise, cybersecurity in web development is a top priority. Over 80% of websites now use HTTPS, ensuring secure data transmission. Web developers are increasingly incorporating security measures to protect user information.

5. Growing Role of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Machine Learning (ML)
AI and ML are transforming the web development landscape, with a 25% increase in AI-based applications. Developers are integrating smart features like chatbots and personalized recommendations to enhance user engagement.

6. Progressive Enhancement withWeb Assembly
WebAssembly (Wasm) usage has grown by 50% in recent years. It enables running complex applications in the browser at near-native speed, opening up new possibilities for web developers to create high-performance applications.

7. Demand for Full-Stack Developers:
Over 70% of job postings for web developers seek full-stack development skills. Companies prefer developers who can handle both front-end and back-end tasks, showcasing the demand for versatile skill sets.

Future Prospects

  • The web development industry is projected to grow by 8.08% during the forecast period, reaching USD 96748.41 million by 2028, outpacing the average for other occupations. The increasing reliance on digital platforms and the evolution of technologies like the Internet of Things (IoT) will drive this growth.
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Frequently Asked Questions for the Web Development Course

A web development course is a structured program that teaches you the skills needed to create websites. It covers languages like HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, along with frameworks and tools to build functional and visually appealing websites.

There are many excellent options, including FreeCodeCamp, Udacity, and Codecademy. Choose based on your learning preferences, whether it’s self-paced, interactive, or more formal.

Yes, full-stack web development is a comprehensive course that covers both front-end (user interface) and back-end (server-side) development. It equips you to handle all aspects of web development.

A web designing and development course teaches the visual and technical aspects of creating websites. It includes design principles, user experience, and coding skills necessary for a well-rounded web developer.

The duration varies. Short courses may take a few weeks, while more extensive programs, like degrees, can span 2 to 4 years. The choice depends on your goals and available time.

Yes, backend development is a crucial part of web development courses. It involves server-side scripting, databases, and server management, ensuring websites function smoothly.

Courses cover a range of topics, including HTML, CSS, JavaScript, frameworks like React or Django, database management, and deployment. They aim to provide a well-rounded skill set for web developers.

After completing a web development course, start building projects to showcase your skills. Create a portfolio, contribute to open-source projects, and consider internships or freelance work to gain practical experience. Keep learning and stay updated on industry trends.

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